Top 12 Awesome Things to do in Brittany

I love the lovely region of Brittany. It’s one of the great historic provinces of France, located in the northwest. It’s my most favorite place in France for so many reasons – great diversity and unique with its remarkable history and Celtic heritage, spectacular natural landscape, gorgeous beaches, and excellent cuisine. To me, even the most idyllic postcard perfect picture of Brittany does not do justice to the place.

Brittany

Typical flower in Brittany

There are so many activities for visitors to enjoy during a stay in Finisterre – meander through the countryside or organize a tour of any of the region’s historic place. Brittany is all about living the good life – nature, heritage, good food and cider, and incredible people. Personally, after a month of stay in Brittany, I found it incredibly difficult to leave.

Love this garden in Roscoff

Since Brittany is a popular location for family holidays in France, here’s my top 12 awesome things to see and do when you visit this impressive region:

1.Wander along Carnac’s long and mysterious rows of standing stones.

The magnificent collection of Standing Stones in Carnac is one of the most extraordinary sites of Brittany. While you can find isolated manmade standing stones scattered throughout the whole region, Carnac features miles and miles of aligned standing stone. It has been protected by UNESCO World Heritage since 1996. We went there with our friends to see the exceptional 6000 years old Neolithic sites and the largest megalithic sites in the world.

Carnac

Carnac

2. Visit the 2nd oldest manmade  monument in the world.

The great Cairn de Barnenez is truly amazing – big pile of stones (75m long, 28m wide, 8m high) and very old (about 7,000 years old) as it was built between 4,800 and 4,000 B.C on a hill overlooking the Bay of Morlaix. It is known as the oldest and largest megalithic burial chamber in Europe, and the second oldest manmade monument in the world.
Did you know? It is about 2,000 years older than the first step pyramid of Egypt and it is much bigger than Stonehenge in the UK.

Cairn de Barnenez

Cairn de Barnenez

3. Explore the beautiful castles.

If you are tired of laying in the sunshine, there are quite a few beautiful castles in Brittany to explore and enjoy. We have visited the following: The Château de Brest (Castle of Brest), which has about 1700 years of history, and considered as the oldest castle in the world still in use. The Château du Taureau (Castle of the Bull), a 16th century defensive castle (about 500 year old castle) which has a messy past but also had lots of different uses in its history. The 16th century Château de Kerjean (Castle of Kerjean), which was originally built as a home for the Barbier family. It was open to the public in 2005 after being restored in the early 21st century.

The Castle of Brest

The Castle of the Bull

The Castle of Kerjean

4. Discover the amazing churches and abbeys.

In Brittany, I love the ancient, massive and elaborately embellished Catholic parish churches. We have visited at least 6 parishes: The Le Folgoet Notre Dame Basilica of the Virgin Mary is a gem of Gothic Flamboyant architecture as it has stunning beautiful Gothic style towers and stunning stained glasses. The Saint Thegonnec Church is famous for its funerary chapel and triumphal arch. The Guimiliau church in the village of Guimiliau is populary known for having the largest calvaries in the region, which are sculpted with about 200 figures. The Chapelle Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle in the little town of Locronan is one of the 12 stages along the pilgrimage route called Grande Troménie. The 16th century Notre Dame de Croaz Batz in Roscoff is well-known for its unique elegant Renaissance style bell tower.  The Cathedrale of St Corentin in Quimper is lauded to be the most beautiful gothic building in Brittany with its majestic stained glass windows.

Le Folgoet Notre Dame Basilica of the Virgin Mary

Saint Thegonnec Church

Chapelle Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle

Notre Dame de Croaz Batz

Cathedrale of St Corentin

5. Amble in the medieval towns.

There are so many medieval towns scattered everywhere in Brittany. Walking through the narrow, winding medieval lanes is all part and parcel of Brittany’s charms. In fact, we had a beautiful walk in the famous town of Locronan which has been listed as a Historic Monument in 1924 and has been awarded the title of most beautiful village in France. Landerneau is another gorgeous medieval town known for its remarkable architectural heritage most specifically the Rohan Bridge, built in the 16th century and inhabited for more than 500 years.
Did you know? Rohan Bridge is the only bridge in Europe that has still people living on it up to these days.

The little town of Locronan

Behind me is the Rohan Bridge in Landerneau.

6. Stroll in Foret de Huelgoat.

I love the stunning landscape and enchanting views in Foret de Huelgoat. It is a charming place to visit for an easy good walk or a picnic. Just time it right with the weather and stroll around the forest for a wonderfully enchanting excursion. In there you can find a great “chaos”, a large collection of huge boulders left after a glacier has melted.

Huelgoat

Huelgoat

7. Hill walking in the Moors of Cragou.

Are you fed up with seaside views but still up for a walk? In a beautiful area in Brittany, not far away from the ocean and with a fabulous climate, lies the wild Moors of Cragou. It is a Reserve area and serves as a haven for the wildlife so that the animals and plants can reproduce. In this area, people are forbidden to build houses, buildings or roads. The rocks stand 282 m above the sea level and remain untouched by mankind, with the exception of a few brave hill-walkers.

Moors of Cragou

Moors of Cragou

8. Day trip to Brittany’s islands.

Apart from its quaint villages, historic towns and breathtaking countryside, Brittany is also known for its pretty islands where you can have a perfect and peaceful break. While we were in Brittany, we hopped to Ile de Batz, one of its beautiful islands. We had a fantastic time there and one of the activities that I would never forget was when we leisurely walked around the whole island while enjoying its superb landscape. Indeed, it’s an exotic gem.

The island of Batz

The island of Batz

The island of Batz

9. Enjoy the magnificent coastal scenery.

Who wouldn’t love wonderful coastal scenery with rich flora and fauna, solitary lighthouses, pretty harbors, dramatic cliffs, amazing rock formations sculpted by the waves? There, the Channel sea meets the Atlantic ocean. The coastal area around Pointe Saint Mathieu provides a splendid views of the coast and a walking area for those who are nature lovers. The extraordinary coastal hamlet of Meneham is notable for its 17th century coastguard’s cottage with a stone roof surrounded by great boulders that are also scattered along the Kerlouan coastline. I am sure you’ll be bewitched by the serene landscapes because everywhere you turn the view is beautiful.

Pointe Saint Mathieu

Kerlouan

Hamlet of Meneham

10. Laze at Brittany’s lovely beaches.

Brittany has loads of great sandy beaches. I noticed that they are rarely really crowded because the water is so cold. Personally, I love the beach, though! We usually go to the Pontusval and Keremma. In Pontusval you can see a lighthouse, the water is very clear and many rocks that have formed intriguing shapes are scattered everywhere, while in Keremma there’s a 6km line of sand dunes (slowly disappearing though L) and translucent water. There are many seaside activities and watersports to enjoy – sunbathing, swimming, fishing, shellfish gathering, diving, sailing, kayaking, etc. The beaches in Brittany are simply a must see!

Pontusval Beach

Pontusval

Keremma Beach

Kerlouan Beach

11. Smack Breton luscious food.

Another thing that you should not miss when you are in Brittany is to try their delicious food – oysters, crepe, Breton butter cake and many more. If you are an oyster lover you can find great oysters in Cancale, a small town in Brittany. Crepe is a traditional Breton food. There are sweet crepes which are made with wheat flour and savory crepes made with buckwheat flour. The Breton butter cake (Kouign Amann) is a rich, mouth-watering dessert made of dough, butter and sugar.

Crêpe Flambée

Breton butter cake (Kouign Amann)

12. Don’t forget to taste Cider.

Even though Brittany does not produce wine, it produces Cider which is considered as Breton’s traditional drink. It is usually drank from clay cups to bring out the earthy flavor of the cider.

France: Château du Taureau

France is renowned for its magnificent castles – from defensive castles to residential castles. In fact, all regions in France have castles open for visit with their own fascinating story to tell.

Château du Taureau also known as the Castle of the Bull. :-)

Château du Taureau also known as the Castle of the Bull. 🙂

One of the beautiful pictures we captured while we were on the boat.

One of the beautiful pictures we captured while we were on the boat.

We took a boat to visit the Château du Taureau (Castle of the Bull), a 16th century island fortress redesigned by Vauban (famous French military architect during the 16th/early 17th century) while we were in Brittany. It is certainly a surprising place, situated in one of the loveliest bays of Brittany in the north-west of France, that was built on a rock in the Bay of Morlaix and welcomes you with open arms.

At the top level of the castle.

At the top level of the castle.

Excited to get into the castle.

Excited to get into the castle.

The boat that took us to the castle.

The boat that took us to the castle.

This 500 year old castle has a messy past and has had many different uses in its history – defensive building against the English raiders at first, then used as a prison where some of the first French Revolutionaries were locked away, then a residence in the 1930s, then it was occupied by the German forces during World War II, then recently a sailing school till 1980 and finally now a museum.

At the first level of the castle.

At the first level of the castle.

At the terrace.

At the terrace.

The tour started with a beautiful commentary by our guide while we were on a boat. One of the amazing things I have learned from our guide was about a black species of bird that thrives in the Bay (I can’t remember the exact name of the bird), which is able to dive 30 meters deep into the sea and stay there for about 3 minutes. In addition, our guide gave us information about the islands surrounding the area. On top of it, the views were great from the boat.

Beautiful view of the port from our boat.

Beautiful view of the port from our boat.

The view of the other side of the port.

The view of the other side of the port.

After a 45 minutes boat trip from Le Diben port, we reached this wonderful fortress. It is beautifully restored and has been renovated over the years as some parts were destroyed during the revolution. As soon as we arrived in the fort, the guide gave us a very clear picture of the history of fortress and then we were free to wander around for about an hour and let our imaginations wonder. The rooms are mostly empty except for activities such as chess, domino, etc. While roaming around, I could imagine what life would have been like for a prisoner of soldier inside this building.

When our guide told us the brief history of the castle.

When our guide told us the brief history of the castle.

One of the rooms in the castle.

One of the rooms in the castle.

Inside the castle.

Inside the castle.

In another room.

In another room.

To me, exploring the Château du Taureau is more than just another visit, this is a journey into the heart of History itself, and a tribute to the memories of the Bay area whose natural treasures are still intact. We meandered around the place, explored the bunkers on the terrace area, strolled along the passageways and had a look at the drawbridge. There are lots of rooms for wonderful panoramic views and stunning 360 degrees views from the terrace.

The view from the terrace.

The view from the terrace.

The view from the boat.

The view from the boat.

Another view from the terrace.

Another view from the terrace.

Our tour at the castle of the Bull was very nice and it was an excellent historical visit. The castle is rooted in local history and it was explained and presented well by our guide who knew how to tell it with passion. It was an experience to discover and it’s pretty rare to see a strong open sea.

One of the windows in the castle where the canon was used to be placed.

One of the windows in the castle where the canon was used to be placed.

If you wish to go there, there are many kinds of visits and many ways to feel the magic of a place such as – a guided tour, a theatrical encounter, a singing or a storytelling experience. In addition, this year, the Château du Taureau has offered new things to do including picnic spots, historic visits and “pirates for little ones” activities.

On the boat and our way to visit the Castle of the Bull.

On the boat and our way to visit the Castle of the Bull.

An island near the castle that people can rent.

An island near the castle that people can rent.

At Le Diben Port.

At Le Diben Port.

Trivia: the Castle of the Bull, because of its location, remains a fairly isolated place. The German army had a garrison there during the Second World War. When Germany capitulated, the garrison at the Castle of the Bull was so isolated that they did not hear about it. The U.S. army had to send a battalion to the castle to inform the surprised German occupants that they had lost the war about a month ago. The US officer in charge of this battalion returned as a tourist to visit the castle in the 1970s.

Little Lilly travel tip:

  • You need to book the trip in advance because the tides do not allow access by boat throughout the whole day.
  • It is not accessible by wheelchair, as there are steps from the boat to the entrance, and in between all levels of the building.
  • A great castle to visit for kids (at any age) and adults alike.
  • All visitors are free to roam around the three levels of the building.
  • There was no toilet in the fort for the public, but there were two on our boat.
  • There is a small gift shop in the fort.
  • When the bells ring, you have to say goodbye to the castle and return to the ship.
  • There is an island near the castle that people can rent.

Have you visited the Château du Taureau? What’s your favourite experience?

France: Le Folgoet Notre Dame Basilica

It was my first time here and I was wowed to see this superb little architectural masterpiece located in the Finistere of Brittany in the north-west of France.

Beautiful Le Folgoet Notre Dame Basilica

Beautiful Le Folgoet Notre Dame Basilica

I love the magnificent details of the Basilica.

I love the magnificent details of the Basilica.

With its stunning stained-glass and its beautiful tower, the Le Folgoet Notre Dame Basilica of the Virgin Mary is a gem of Gothic Flamboyant architecture. The Gothic style tower is simple yet magnificent. The basilica is topped by a wonderful spire and has an unusual square shape. The 15th century granite jube, the gorgeous 19th century roses adorning the cross chapel and apse and the charming 15th century statue of Our Lady of Folgöet, all those are remarkable. Certainly, this medieval Basilica is one of the most beautiful churches in the heart of Finistere and one of the most magical sights in Brittany.

dazzling stained glass

dazzling stained glass

The pictures on the stained glass represents the life story of Salin, the mad guy.

During the visit, I learned that a long time ago in the town of Folgoet there was a mad guy called Salin who always sang “Ave Maria” in the wild forest. When he died in November, a white flower grew and bloomed for 6 six weeks from his mouth with Ave Maria written in golden letters on the leaves. When the villagers saw it, they were surprised because it was unusual for the flower to grow as it was the end of autumn. So the villagers informed the priest and when they dug into the ground, they found out that the flower grew from the mouth of Salin. Because of this miracle a Basilica was built upon his grave in the 15th century. All this around the legend of Salin and lots more to discover!

A statue of the Virgin Mary

A statue of the Virgin Mary

So, when the Duchess of Brittany and Queen of France Anne heard about the miracle, she decided to give donations, and amazing sculptures and ornaments were created to embellish the Basilica.

Wonderful decorations outside the church

Wonderful decorations outside the church

It was indeed a great and interesting tour of this sumptuous site! Thank you to our brilliant guide from SPREV for making our visit a memorable one. 🙂

Little Lilly travel tip:

  • Excellent tour guides who belong to an organization SPREV which is dedicated to preserving and promoting religious sites located within cities are available in the summer.
  • There’s a museum across the street.

Have you visited Le Folgoet Notre Dame Basilica? Or do you have a favourite church for us to explore the next time we’re in Brittany?

France: Exploring Pointe St Mathieu

We headed from Kerlouan to Pointe Saint Mathieu on a sunny and clear day so the destination was all that more spectacular and, when we arrived there, the view was so clear that we could see for miles. This dramatic and romantic point is located in a province called Finistere at the very Western end point of continental France, on a rocky point, with craggy coast all around, with its lighthouses and ruins of an old abbey and cathedral, and L’Iroise sea outside. Pointe St Mathieu is a significant landmark and one of the greatest places to visit in Brittany.

There's so much history and so much to see.

There’s so much history and so much to see.

The Abbey of St. Mathieu

The abbey of St. Mathieu is about 1000 years old. It was built in 1000 AD and it was rebuilt into a church in 1200 AD. It was built close to the Atlantic Ocean and English Channel. The church was destroyed during the French Revolution. The ruins of the old Saint Mathieu abbey and church are really impressive and give a big contrast of modern and medieval building design.

Some parts of the ruins.

Some parts of the ruins.

Beautiful ruins of the church.

Beautiful ruins of the church.

The ruins and the newest lighthouse.

The ruins and the newest lighthouse.

The lighthouses

There were 3 lighthouses built around the church. The smallest lighthouse was built in the 11th century. The lighthouse with round orange on the top was built in the early 19th century and is open for visitors. If you don’t mind the 163 steps, it is well worth the climb. The gray lighthouse, the newest and modern, was built in the 20th century. The modern lighthouse is the only lighthouse that is functioning at present as it has modern equipment such as radar. I heard that L’Iroise is one of the world’s busiest sea routes, but also hard to navigate. For that reason, there are a large number of lighthouses built all around.

The first lighthouse built in the 11th century.

The first lighthouse built in the 11th century.

The second lighthouse built in the 19th century.

The second lighthouse built in the 19th century.

The third lighthouse built in 20th century.

The third lighthouse built in 20th century.

Magnificent landscape

The whole coastal area around Pointe Saint Mathieu provides a beautiful walking area and an ideal walk for nature lovers and for those who love to walk, with splendid views of the coast, the cliffs, and the lighthouse. The paths are well marked and safe, but provide some very moderate challenge of climbing up and down the hills. While we were walking, I saw many different types of wildflowers growing all around the cliffs and many different sea birds flying past.

It is a very nice place at the end of the land.

It is a very nice place at the end of the land.

It was indeed a good coastal walks.

It was indeed a good coastal walks.

The small museum

The museum provides historical information about the abbey and the church.

The cenotaph (National maritime memorial monument)

The national maritime memorial monument was dedicated to the sailors who died at sea during the different wars.

The monument at the background is the cenotaph.

The monument at the background is the cenotaph.

While we were in the area, we leisurely wandered around the place and I enjoyed the visit very much. I found the whole site more compact and very peculiar than I expected as it has something for everyone – lots of history (ancient and modern), culture, architecture, old buildings, nature, magnificent landscape, sea, hills, chilly wind, pleasant walk and some romance. I could imagine that it would be excellent to stroll in the evening or stand at the point and watch all the blinking lighthouses while listening to the waves in the dark. It is a geographically interesting place to visit and well worth the effort. Indeed, we had a beautiful seascapes and a relaxing break.

Even the wild flowers are beautiful.

Even the wild flowers are beautiful.

Little Lilly Travel Tip:

  • The parking area is free.
  • The access to most of the sites is free.
  • The entrance fee to the museum and to go up to the lighthouse is very reasonable.
  • Public toilet is just nearby the parking area.
  • There is a hotel just nearby the parking area.

France: Exploring the Elaborate Parish Closes (Catholic Parishes) of Bretagne

One of the things we like in Brittany is the ancient, massive and elaborately embellished parish closes (Catholic parish churches), dating back from the 16th and 17th century.

I just love the place

A parish close is a distinctive feature of Breton culture, a completely enclosed area around the parish church, religious architecture particular to Brittany in north western France. I have learned that there are about 70 magnificently decorated Catholic Parishes which are predominantly found in Finistere.

Impressive! 🙂

The parish close is surrounded by a wall which contains a parish church and other religious buildings and structures such as:

  • A monumental archway or gate giving access to the parish close.
  • A calvary which represents Jesus on the cross and some includes elaborate scenes from the bible.
  • An ossuary which a container or room in which the bones of dead people are placed.
  • A porch often decorated with statues of the apostles and local saints.
  • A cemetery.

1. Saint Thegonnec Church

Saint Thegonnec Church

Saint Thegonnec church is located in the village of Saint Thegonnec which has a total population of about 3,000. It is famous for its superb calvary or crucifix at the church yard, funerary chapel, triumphal arch and church. It has a large ceremonial entrance which emphasizes the significance of the close as a focus for pilgrimage and pardons.

Outside the church, there is a charnel house where you can see the ossuary with a life-sized tableau of the Entombment of Christ and the souvenir sections, prayer books, guides and other religious materials.I noticed that the interior of the church is exemplary of the local version of Baroque style with a large quantity of polychrome and sculpture and spectacular decoration such as a pulpit which was built in 1683 and is considered as one of the masterpieces of Breton sculpture.

2. Guimiliau Church

The largest calvary in the church yard of Guimiliau Church

Guimiliau church is located in the village of Gumiliau which is named after St Miliau and has a population of about 1,000. Guimiliau is popularly known by its impressive parish close dating back from the 16th century.

I have learned that Saint Miliau was a good Breton prince who was invoked for healing ulcers and rheumatism. He was put to death on the orders of his brother because of a dynastic quarrel in the 6th or 9th century. It is also known as the birthplace of Saint Herve who was an ascetic in the 6th century and one of the most famous Breton saints.

The magnificent Calvary or crucifix is the center piece in the church yard. I have learned that it is one of the largest calvaries in the region which is sculpted with about 200 figures.Upon entering the church, it was hard to miss the polychrome statues of the twelve apostles.The church contains many fine examples of polychrome sculpture from the sixteenth century onwards such as octagonal baptistery, several large stables, a carved pulpit, and collection of banners used in religious processions at pardons.

3. Notre Dame de Croaz Batz in Roscoff

The beautiful Renaissance style bell tower of Notre Dame de Croaz-Batz in Roscoff 🙂

The 16th century Church of Notre Dame de Croaz-Batz (Our Lady of Croaz Batz), in the centre of the town, is considered as the most important monument in Roscoff. It is a Renaissance and Gothic church which was built by the sea in 1520. The church was named after a cross on quay, the “Croaz-Batz” in Breton. It is known because of its unique elegant Renaissance style bell tower in Brittany that dominates the skyline and has several interesting features.

In the churchyard, we saw two ossuaries which can only be accessed through a strangely arched door on the outside of the enclosure wall. When you enter the parish close, the ossuary on your left, which is wonderfully decorated by an elaborate double row of balusters, was built in the 17th century while the ossuary on the right was built in the 16th century.

While we were exploring inside the church, I noticed that the main altar has two side doors which both lead to the sacristy and above the doors are semi-circular panels with carved dolphins, I also saw high spirited putti or cherubic children along with Saint Peter and Saint Paul at both sides.I noticed that all churches in Brittany have a statue of a cockerel at the very top of their tower. It turns with the wind just to point the direction of the wind to everybody especially to fishermen. At 7pm, the bells ring 12 times twice to announce the end of the day of work, a custom dating back to the 19th century and before.

at the entrance of Notre Dame

These parish churches captured my senses because each village in Brittany may it be a small or a big village has a huge and well decorated parish close when compared to its population. It is just amazing. I have learned that the locals financed the construction and procured all the stunning decoration of each church. It seemed that on the 16th and 17th century, one way to show off that their village was powerful and wealthy was by building a bigger church than the rest of the villages in Brittany, as during this time Breton people were enthusiastic Catholics.

I love the atmosphere that always seems to surround the parish closes in Brittany. To me, I find it well worth seeking out as all of them have a different character. I look forward to seeing a few more next time we go back to France.

Have you visited any churches in Bretagne, France? Which church would you recommend to visit next time?

 

France: The Beautiful Collection of Megalithic Sites in Carnac

We traveled to Carnac in the Southern part of Brittany, France, with our dearest friends to see the exceptional 6000 year old Neolithic sites. It is thought to be the largest collection of megalithic sites in the world because there are more than 3,000+ large, free standing stones scattered around the countryside of Carnac; which is only a fraction of what was originally there. The estimate for what was originally there was 10,000+ Neolithic Menhirs (from the Britton “Long / Upright Stones”), also popularly known as standing stones. The magnificent collection of standing stones in Carnac is one of the hidden gems of Brittany; it has been protected by UNESCO World Heritage since 1996.

Stones as far as the eyes can see

It was erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany during the Neolithic era which is approximately between 4500 BC to 2000BC. The reason why those stones were erected remains a mystery. There are several hypotheses, such as: First, it might be related to astronomy, the way Stonehenge is supposed to be. Second, it might be related to religion. Third, successive generations might have visited the site and erected stones to see who had the biggest one. One might see a correlation with the way even humble villages all over Brittany had been building big churches with rather impressive bell-towers from the 15th century till the end of the 19th century to see who had the biggest one. Possibly. Occam’s blade and all…

Lots of stones

We went there during the summer, July 2013, during which the number of people in Carnac swells from the influx of tourists, since this place is very popular, especially during July and August. We wanted to get inside the sites so that we could see the Menhirs closely and appreciate them even more, but when we arrived at the place there was no available guide and we couldn’t get inside the site without a guide even if we had tickets.

Amazing number of standing stones

It was a nice wander.

There are many sites which display outstanding collection of these upright megalithic Menhirs and if you wish to visit all the sites you need to buy a ticket for each site. The ticket costs €6 for an adult and free for children below 18 years old. It used to be free all, indeed it had been free for about 6000 years, but the UNESCO decided about 15 years ago that tourists were a danger to the standing stones. One even has to wear closed shoes to get inside the Menhir fields. Strange. Not even Petra, the Mont Saint Michel, the Angkor Wat or Notre Dame de Paris have so stringent rules for visitors. It seems to me that the UNESCO had turned a 5-star walk into a succession of graveyards for standing stones.

We spent few minutes relaxing here. Love the different shades of green. 🙂

We walked around the sites in order to bring the prehistory to life for a short while since we couldn’t get inside the sites. I was told that 15 years ago, there was no fence and everybody was free to get closer to the Menhirs. There is a local association called “Menhirs Libres (Free Standing Stones)”, which still campaigns for the right to see those Standing Stones without having the feeling that both the visitors and the Stones are in some kind of jail-like cemetery.

A local organization called Menhirs Libres

Anyway, during this visit, I have learned that the size of each monolith varies from thigh-high size up to roughly 6 meters high. Awesome! Also, the megaliths include: Alignment which means rows of standing stones, Dolmen which means Lying Stone, Cairn which means a stone monument covering burial places, Enclosure which means a space which is closed off by adjoining or close megaliths, and Menhirs which means large, free-standing stones.

A Cairn

I would say that it was a lovely walk amongst the megaliths. Indeed, Carnac is a place one should not miss when you visit Brittany, France. 🙂

Have you visited the Megalithic sites in Carnac?